These 5 Symptoms Are Sent By Your Body One Month Before A Heart Attack



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More than a million Americans have a heart attack each year! Fatty matter, calcium, proteins, and inflammatory cells build up within the arteries to form plaques of different sizes. The plaque deposits are hard on the outside and soft on the inside.

When the plaque is hard, the outer shell cracks (plaque rupture), platelets (disc-shaped particles in the blood that aid clotting) come to the area, and blood clots form around the plaque. If a blood clot totally blocks the artery, the heart muscle becomes “starved” for oxygen. Within a short time, death of heart muscle cells occurs, causing permanent damage. This is a heart attack.

But, there are also numerous other factors that cause heart failure and the most often are: smoking, obesity, high cholesterol levels and unhealthy lifestyle habits. A late study has revealed that men are more vulnerable from heart attacks than women.

The most often warning symptoms that appear weeks before a heart attack include:

Chest pain
Backache
Pain in the left arm
Discomfort in the jaw
Fatigue

How to prevent a heat attack from happening:

You want what’s best for your heart. And it’s simpler than you might think. These 10 lifestyle changes can help prevent a heart attack and heart disease.

Eat for your future. Add plenty of fruits and veggies, grains, and foods high in omega-3 fatty acids like fresh tuna or herring to your diet. Eat less salt, saturated fats, sweets, and red meats. Avoid trans fats. Avoid food with “hydrogenated” or “partially hydrogenated” ingredients. A variety in your diet is a good way to get all the nutrients you need.

Take it easy. Find a relaxation method that works for you. Yoga, meditation, dedicated time to unwind after work — these can help keep your stress levels down. Stressful emotions such as anger and hostility may also lead to heart attack risk, so keep calm and be cool.

Ban smoking. If you never started smoking, kudos! If you already quit, excellent. If you still smoke, stop. Talk to your doctor to find out what method will work best for you. Even people who smoke fewer than five cigarettes a day can have early signs of heart disease. Get started — in just one year you can reduce your risk of a heart attack.

Keep tabs on your blood pressure. If it’s too high, your risk of heart attack and disease goes up. Stress management, a healthy diet, and regular exercise can help you manage your blood pressure. Your doctor may also prescribe medications to lower your levels.

Mind your blood sugar. Too much sugar in your blood can damage your arteries, even if you don’t have diabetes. Work with your doctor to control your levels. That may lower your chance of having a heart attack or stroke. Remember, you can’t tell if you have diabetes (or high blood pressure, or high cholesterol) based on how you feel.

Be smart about cholesterol. When blood runs through your heart, it can drop traces of cholesterol, fat, and calcium, creating a buildup of plaque in your arteries. Too much of it makes a heart attack more likely. If you don’t know your cholesterol numbers, ask your doctor for a blood test.

Don’t wait to lose weight. If you If you have extra pounds, it can put your heart at risk. Exercise and a good diet help. Ask your doctor or a dietitian what your goal should be and how to get there.

Ask about aspirin. Talk with your doctor about taking an aspirin daily. In some people, this reduces the risk of heart attack.

Get a move on. Hit the treadmill or the trail. Walk around the neighborhood or go for a swim. Whatever activity best fits your needs, do it! Regular exercise can prevent heart disease, lower blood pressure, and improve cholesterol levels.

Keep a social safety net. Stay in touch with your friends and family. Research shows that people with more social support are less prone to heart trouble. As you grow your network and make new friends, know that you might be good for their heart health, too.


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