Women embracing their natural grey hair could be this year’s beauty trend


Women are constantly facing pressures to stay young and beautiful forever. The biggest indication of this, is how women are taught to despise their grey hair. Even though greying is a natural part of the aging process – with some women greying even sooner than others – there’s a need to cover it up.


However, there seems to be a movement among women to embrace their grey and reclaim the beauty standards surrounding grey hair. 2019 seems to be the year that women of all ages embrace whatever hair they have and celebrate it, grey and all.

If you are wondering what that looks like, take a look at the images below. 

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“I can remember being in 7th grade during a school “break” in the courtyard and my best friend grasping at the top of my head and exclaiming, “You have a gray hair!” She affectionately termed this my unicorn hair, and we watched as the year went on and more and more unicorn hair appeared on my head. By the time I was 16, I had more unicorn hair than I could pull out or hide by changing my part, and I began coloring it on a monthly basis. This continued for six years until some time in 2015 when I began thinking, what if I just let it go, quit spending so much money and time on covering my gray, and just LET IT GO. Honestly, I was pretty hesitant, but one evening when my boyfriend and his sweet family heard I was contemplating going gray, they encouraged me whole heartedly, giving me that boost of confidence I was lacking. Now, I wish I had never even began dying my hair in the first place! Here I am today, at 27 years old, and I’ve sported a full head of gray hair for going on four years! The growing out stage was awkward of course. I even interviewed at my current firm with half gray, half brown hair thinking, “Please don’t let them think I’m crazy.” I can’t count how many people stop me on a DAILY basis to talk about my hair – it is the ultimate icebreaker. I’ve turned so many strangers into friends – young/old, male/female…, you name it. My heart feels so full when someone tells me I’ve inspired them to embrace their natural beauty as well – whatever it may be! So, what I’d like to say to you is, don’t hide your natural beauty, whatever it may be – embrace it! You’ll soon thank yourself.” @marina.l.defoor #grombre #gogrombre

A post shared by Going grey with (grohm)(bray) (@grombre) on

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“I started pulling my hair out (trichotillomania) when I was in 5th grade for many reasons, which very generally include the culturally- and personally-loaded significance of hair as a signifier of beauty and value for women. As I grew older, getting positive attention around appearance-related things can feel more than embarrassing; it can feel unsafe for me— as it does for many women who have survived trauma involving sexual violence. And it isn’t a coincidence that I started growing my hair out at the same time as I started confronting past traumas and undergoing treatment for PTSD. Letting my white shine has paralleled my winning battle with unjustified shame. My hair has also grown right along with my ability to practice radical acceptance and self-compassion, both works in progress.” @kelaenoptera #grombre #gogrombre

A post shared by Going grey with (grohm)(bray) (@grombre) on

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“‘The quickest way to acquire self-confidence is to do exactly what you are afraid to do.’ ~ Anonymous 🌪 I was definitely afraid to go grey. I put it off for several years until I just decided to go for it and deal with the uncomfortableness of making a change that would take months and months. 🌪 Years ago, a therapist I was seeing for depression and social anxiety said something like “fake it ‘til you make it.” I wasn’t really buying it at the time, but I have found that it definitely works for me transitioning to grey. During this process there are so many times when I just acted like my hair was completely grey, pretended my hair didn’t look strange — that there was no demarcation line. I walk around really feeling that self-confidence. I think I’ve gotten to the point now — 12 months in — where I’m owning it and have a better level of confidence. But it’s a process just like growing these silvers.” @jd904 #grombre #gogrombre

A post shared by Going grey with (grohm)(bray) (@grombre) on

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“Nearly 5 months and counting! I dyed my hair for the last time on November 4, 2018. I’m 41 and started prematurely graying at 30. (I get it from my Daddy 😊) Before then, I had accepted that dyeing my hair was going to be my life until I’m at least in my 50s because gray hair “made me look so old and like I’ve let myself go”. I was really fine with coloring it even though it was an annoying, timely and messy process at home and expensive at salons. My husband had been encouraging me to grow out my gray hair for years, but I wasn’t ready. Then, (I don’t even remember precisely how it happened) I started seeing here on Instagram that I wasn’t alone, that I wasn’t the only woman whose gray strands were taking over her hair. AND that I wasn’t alone in my initial feelings of frustration and sometimes embarrassment that my hair color didn’t fall in line with traditional beauty/age standards. The last straw was seeing gray hairs make their debut less than two weeks after coloring! I realized it was time to give up and let nature run its course with dignity. So here I am! I’m natural, but I recently straightened my hair to stretch it and see how far it’s grown. Here is my journey so far.” @takisha123 #grombre #gogrombre

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